This page was last updated: 31st January 2020  

4th CMR Medals



Medals


In all 215 medals (202 medals plus 13 Bars) were awarded to 188 men who served at some time with the 4th CMR. With the research still ongoing, as certainly this list is not exhaustive, it is noted here that not all medals were awarded whilst in actual service with the 4th CMR, as some were awarded for action with another regiment, before or after transfer to or from the 4th CMR. This will be specifically noted in the citation where known. All images are credited where not held by 4cmr.com


Notwithstanding, where a citation exists, this section acknowledges and celebrates all men who had served with the 4th CMR and who had been awarded a medal at some point in their service.



Awards

MedalNumberBar
VC2-
DSO8-
MC352
DCM371
MM9910
MSM6-
Croix de Guerre12-
Order of the Rising Sun1-
Order of the Sacred Treasure1-
Russian Order of St. Stanislas1-

Both the Order of the Rising Sun and the Order of the Sacred Treasure were Japanese medals, issued by the Emperor.






The London Gazette, the time honoured public record of awards notices, was not consistent with the inclusion of full citations, especially in busy times. However, here follows as many of the citations as could be found for the 4th CMR awards.



VC - Victoria Cross



Of the 2 VCs awarded, only one was to a man for his actions actually with the 4th CMR:


838301 Pte. Thomas "Tommy" William Holmes, VC


The formal citation from the London Gazette, LG30471, of 11th January 1918, reads:


"For most conspicuous bravery and resource when the right flank of our attack was held up by heavy machine-gun and rifle fire from a 'pill-box' strong point. Heavy casualties were producing a critical situation when Pte. Holmes, on his own initiative and single-handed, ran forward and threw two bombs, killing and wounding the crews of two machine guns. He then returned to his comrades, secured another bomb, and again rushed forward alone under heavy fire and threw the bomb into the entrance of the 'pill-box,' causing the nineteen occupants to surrender. By this act of valour at a very critical moment Pte. Holmes undoubtedly cleared the way for the advance of our troops and saved the lives of many of his comrades."


The entry in the 4th CMR's War Diary reads as follows:


"Action for which Commended - For great valour and bravery during the action of October 26th 1917, near PASSCHENDAELE.


When his Company was within 50 yards of a pill-box and was held up and forced to take cover, by two Machine Guns, mounted nearby, and by rifle-fire from the pill-box, he, on his own initiative, and single-handed ran forward and threw a bomb, killing the crew and putting the guns out of action. He then returned to his companions, secured another bomb, and again, under heavy fire, ran forward alone and threw the bomb into the entrance causing the nineteen occupants to surrender."

The other VC was awarded to:


158524 Lt. Graham Thomson Lyall, VC.


Formerly a Corporal with the 4th CMR, Graham was transferred to the 102nd Battalion in late September 1917, from which time this award was made.


"For most conspicuous bravery and skilful leading during the operations north of Cambrai. On September 27th, 1918, whilst leading his platoon against Bourlon Wood, he rendered invaluable support to the leading company, which was held up by a strong point, which he captured, by a flank movement, together with thirteen prisoners, one field gun and four machine guns.


Later, his platoon, now much weakened by casualties, was held up by machine guns at the southern end of Bourlon Wood. Collecting any men available, he led them towards the strong point, and springing forward alone, rushed the position single-handed and killed the officer in charge, subsequently capturing at this point forty-five prisoners and five machine guns. Having made good his final objective, with a further capture of forty-seven prisoners, he consolidated his position and thus protected the remainder of the company.


On October 1st, in the neighbourhood of Blecourt, when in command of a weak company, by skilful dispositions he captured a strongly defended position, which yielded eighty prisoners and seventeen machine guns. During two days of operations Lt. Lyall captured in -all 3 officers, 182 other ranks, 26 machine guns and one field gun, exclusive of heavy casualties inflicted. He showed throughout the utmost valour and high powers of command."





DSO - Distinguished Service Order





Major Walter Wallbridge Denison, DSO


"For conspicuous gallantry. He held on to his position under an intense bombardment, and later, after retiring in order to make a stand at another post, collected a few men and went back to gather information."


Major Charles Herbert McLean, DSO


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty near Valenciennes on 1st November, 1918. With a view to locating points for bridging the Escaut Canal, ha and one man crossed it on an improvised bridge of a plank, raft and boat. Here he was immediately engaged by a machine gun, which he at once attacked, killing one man, and holding the remainder at bay until assistance arrived, when he captured the machine gun and ten men. A post was thus established, which enabled a crossing to be effected on the entire battalion frontage without a casualty."


Lt.-Col. William Reginald Patterson, DSO


"For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led the attacking force with the greatest courage and determination, and captured two of the enemy's trenches. Later, he organised bombing attacks, and consolidated the position, sending back most valuable information."

Major Wilfred Victor Sifton, DSO


For his part in the attack on Folies, 9th August 1918


"Owing to his initiative, and as the result of a personal reconnaissance, he was able to save his company from heavy casualties by taking his men to a new jumping-off place. During an advance of four kilometres under heavy fire he directed the attack of three companies, two company commanders having become casualties, and then organised the battalion outpost line. Throughout the entire action he sent back valuable information to his C.O., and by personal reconnaissance established communications with the flanking units. He set a splendid example to all ranks."





MC - Military Cross




113090 Lt. Archie Henry Black, MC


"For gallantry and devotion to duty during operations 5th November, 1918, near Vicq. He made a daring reconnaissance before the assault, gaining valuable information, greatly assisting the success of the operations. Later, during the assault, he personally supervised the establishing of a defensive flank under heavy rifle and machine gun fire."



Click here for Archie Black's biography page


Lt. Horace Andrew Blake, MC


"For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led his platoon under very heavy fire with great courage and determination. Later, he successfully led his men in a charge on two of the enemy's trenches, and effectively consolidated his position."

109247 Capt. Leslie Bernard Bumstead, MC+Bar


MC - for actions in an attack on Humbug Sap (near Loos, France), on 22nd April 1918

"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer planned and carried out a raid for the purpose of securing identifications. Personally leading one of the sections he killed many of the enemy, and brought back two prisoners and a machine gun. His skill and handling of the men were largely responsible for the success of the undertaking."


Bar - for actions in the attack on Foiles village, during which he was wounded, on 9th August 1918

"For gallantry and devotion to duty during action. When at the start this officer received a gunshot wound in the back, he carried on, directing the advance of his company, a distance of over 3 kilometres. Not till the objective was reached and consolidated, and the wounded cared for, did he consent to be evacuated himself. He set a splendid example."

Click here for Leslie Bumstead's biography page


Capt. Gregory Clark, MC


Whilst still a Lieutenant, likely due to actions at Vimy Ridge in April 1917:


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He assumed command of and led his Company with great ability, gained his objective, and consolidated the position. He set a fine example of courage and initiative."



Click here for Gregory Clark's biography page


Capt. William Edgar Lawrence Coleman, MC+Bar


MC

"For conspicuous gallantry. He held on to his post during a very heavy bombardment till he had only seven unwounded men left, and then retired to make a stand at another point. Though wounded, he returned at once to duty."


Bar

"For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led his company with great courage and determination, capturing two of the enemy's trenches. Later, he consolidated and maintained his position."

Major Henry Clarke Davis, MC+Bar


MC: "For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as regimental medical officer. He was continually on duty for four days and nights, under heavy fire, attending to the wounded, and frequently dressed cases in the open. His courage and determination were responsible for the evacuation of all the wounded before the battalion was relieved."


Bar: "He was in charge of the evacuation of wounded from the forward area during the fighting, in front of Cambrai, commencing 28th September, 1918. He formed routes of evacuation under heavy machine-gun and shell fire. He guided parties of stretcher-bearers in front of the Regimental Aid Posts at St. Olle and Sailly, and collected many wounded men. Throughout he showed great gallantry and devotion to duty."


Click here for Henry Davis's biography page


Hon. Capt. Chaplain William Henry Davis, MC


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While the fighting was still in progress he organised and led stretcher parties into the forward area under heavy shell and machine-gun fire. He searched "No Man's Land" throughout the day in full view of the enemy, and set a splendid example of courage and determination."



Click here for William Davis's biography page


Lt. Arthur Wemyss Deacon, MC


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Though his right arm was shattered early in the attack, and he was suffering severely, he successfully led an attack on two "pill-boxes," and continued to direct the operations of his company until the position had been consolidated. His example of courage and fortitude contributed largely to the success of the operation."


Lt. Robert Stevenson Dunlop, MC


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty near Boiry on 28th August, 1918. He was twice wounded early in the attack, but led his platoon to its objective and consolidated. Knowing that twelve officers of the battalion had already been wounded he refused to be evacuated until relieved the following morning. He was of great assistance to the battalion commander."

Lt. Arthur James Everett, MC+Bar


MC - No citation available, but awarded during his time with the Canadian Light Horse.


Bar - awarded during his time with the 10th Canadian Infantry Brigade

"In front of Dury, 3rd September, he made a most daring and valuable reconnaissance of the forward area, which was under direct observation of the enemy. Notwithstanding the fact that the enemy were sniping with artillery all the movement, he pushed on over the open through extremely heavy shelling and confirmed the position of the line, and carried urgent and important orders to a battalion commander, who was cut off from communication with brigade headquarters. The example, devotion to duty, and initiative of this officer throughout the operations were most marked and worthy of great praise."


Major Melville Mason Hart, MC+Bar


MC

"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his company in the most gallant manner and captured his objective. Later, he was largely responsible for repelling a strong enemy counter-attack."


No citation available for the Bar.


Lt. Milton Berkley Hastings, MC - whilst attached to the 3rd Trench Mortar Battery


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer was in charge of the forward mobile section of the battery advancing with the infantry. In spite of casualties to his men and many difficulties he kept the battery on the move by his determination and disregard of danger.


Lt. Geoffrey Heighington, MC


For actions in an attack on Humbug Sap (near Loos, France), on 22nd April 1918


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This officer led the right section of a raiding party, which penetrated 400 yards into the enemy's defences, killing many, and capturing a machine gun. During the subsequent withdrawal he held a communication trench, enabling it to be carried out safely, and all the wounded to be evacuated. His leadership and example contributed to the success."


Capt. Douglas Gordon Higgins, MC - although initially assigned to the 4th CMR as a Lieutenant, the following MC was awarded for actions whilst attached to the 9th Battery, 3rd Brigade Canadian Field Artillery.


"For conspicuous gallantry and good leadership between 31st August and 3rd September, 1918, during the capture of the Drocourt-Queant line, and other ground in front of Arras. He was in charge of the ammunition wagons, and brought up the ammunition along roads which were constantly shelled. On 2nd September, while leading forward the battery to a position far forward in support of the infantry, one of his teams was hit by a shell. He showed great coolness in removing the wounded and rearranging his teams, so that little delay was caused. Throughout the engagement, though the battery was constantly firing, the ammunition supply never failed."

Capt. Robert Melrose Hood, MC, Croix de Guerre, Russian Order of St. Stanislas 2nd Class with Swords


Initially assigned to the 4th CMR between 1st February 1916 and 31st December 1917 as L/Cpl. and leaving it as CQMS, Robert was assigned variously to the 2nd Central Ontario Regiment Depot (2nd C.O.R.D.), the 1st C.O.R.D. He was eventually assigned to the North Russia Expeditionary (Syren) Force as Acting Captain in mid-September 1918.


The MC, and likely the Russian Order medal, was awarded for actions whilst serving with the Syren Force.


"He was in charge of the armoured train in the taking of Ourosozero, 11th April, 1919. When the train neared the station he ran ahead and shot three enemy with his revolver, one of whom was putting a shell in a field gun to fire at the train. His great gallantry and promptitude prevented this field gun damaging the train."

Capt. Clarence Lea, MC


Although there is no direct citation to refer to, the following detail was reported by the Toronto Star on 4th January 1917, pertaining to actions under heavy fire at the outset of the 13 day 'Battle for Mount Sorrel' on 2nd June 1916. Though the article states the action was at Courcellete, it was in fact near Sanctuary Wood, Ypres:


"Capt. Clarence Lea... has been awarded the Military Cross for getting transports through to the 4th C.M.R. Battalion when that unit was hard pressed at Courcellete on June 2nd."


Click here for Clarence Lea's biography page


Lt. Merrill Whedon MacDowell, MC


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his platoon with great courage and skill in spite of severe losses, to within fifty yards of his objective, and maintained his position, inflicting heavy losses on the enemy in a counter-attack."

Major Addison Alexander "Lex" Mackenzie, MC


Captain at the time, for actions in the attack on Regina Trench in October 1916:


"For conspicuous gallantry in action. He carried out a daring reconnaissance of the enemy's wire in daylight. Later he led his Company with great courage and determination, greatly assisting the bombers by sniping the enemy as they brought up reinforcements."


Click here for Addison Mackezie's biography page


Lt. Ernest Victor McMillan, MC


"For conspicuous gallantry and endurance on 28th August, 1918, near Boisy. During the assembly for the attack he was severely wounded as well as four other officers and five non-commissioned officers, and the company became disorganised. In spite of his wounds he rallied them and led them with cheers through violent shell, rifle and machine-gun fire to their objective. In the end he was only able to crawl on his hands and knees, but remained at duty until support arrived."


Major. Albert Percy Menzies, MC


Whilst a Lieutenant, for actions against Regina Trench, on 10th October 1916, following loss of their guide to injury:


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Having led his company to the final objective, he took command of the whole front line objective, and consolidated under intense fire of every description. He showed great resource and initiative in keeping touch with other units, establishing strong advanced posts, and in personally patrolling his 500 yards of frontage, and it was largely owing to his personal efforts that hostile counter-attacks were repelled."


Lt. Reginald Mitchell, MC


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 26th August, 1918, near Monchy. Shortly after jumping off, an enemy trench mortar opened rapid fire on the advancing troops. Leading a section down the Scarpe Valley, he overcame the infantry opposition and captured the mortar, killing the crew. Later, after twice leading a section against a machine-gun post, and being repulsed with loss, he crept up alone, killing the crew with his revolver, and capturing the gun."

Lt. Alfred George Moore, MC


Alfred was initially a Private when assigned to the 4th CMR, but early in 1916 was transferred to the 3rd Canadian Signal Company. Latterly he was transferred to the 54th (Kootenay) Battalion, on 21st August 1918.


"For great gallantry and initiative at Cambria on September 27th, 1918, and succeeding days. As signalling officer of the battalion he established and kept connection during the whole of the operations between forward companies and battalion headquarters, going out several times in face of very heavy barrage and laying wire and assisting his men in repairing breaks. Later, on the adjutant being wounded, he took over his duties and ably performed them. He rendered excellent service."


Lt. Beecher Doran Poyser, MC


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an attack. He led the foremost wave in the assault, and, in spite of serious resistance, gained the objective. Both his flanks became exposed, and he was subjected to severe enfilade fire, but he established his men in a good position and secured his flanks. He broke up an enemy counter-attack, and at once sent out a patrol which brought in prisoners. His example of courage and resource was largely instrumental in holding the ground gained."



Click here for Beecher Poyser's biography page


Lt. Frank Clifford Thomson, MC


For action in the vicinity of Pelves and Monchy, France


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 28th August, 1918, near Boisy. He led his platoon to its objective in the teeth of fire of all descriptions. Though wounded in the face and gassed he assisted in breaking up a counter-attack, and reorganised his own men as well as the elements of two other battalions. Later, when all the officers of two companies had become casualties, he took command of the entire front line, and held on until relieved the following morning."


Lt. Harold James Wood, MC


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. After reaching his objective and consolidating his position, he ascertained that the troops on his flank were held up. He personally conducted a bombing party along the trench, clearing it of the enemy, and enabling these troops to attain their final objective. In this operation he displayed exceptional courage and determination, personally accounting for several of the enemy, and by his skilful direction secured prisoners, and completely broke up all resistance. He was seriously wounded while successfully repelling a hostile counter-attack, but continued with his men until he became so exhausted that he had to be carried out. His leadership and example at all times was a splendid incentive to his men."





DCM - Distinguished Conduct Medal

838884 Pte. George Alexander Bell, DCM


The 4th CMR was in the line 5km to the east of Arras when they were involved in a planned attack on Monchy-le-Preux on 26th August 1918. During that action George excelled himself in the line of duty. The citation reads:


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the action near Monchy on 26th August, 1918. While following a company in the attack, with two other scouts, for report work, he found the company held up by a nest of machine guns. With the other two men he worked round the flank, shot one gunner, wounded another, and captured fourteen prisoners and four machine guns."


Click here for George Bell's biography page


838036 Sgt. George Carr, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty near Boiry on 28th August, 1918. Early in the attack all his officers and senior N.C.O.s were wounded, and on his own initiative he took charge. Later he was severely wounded, but directed the attack until the objective was reached and consolidated. His initiative and endurance were largely responsible for the success of the company."


Click here for George Carr's biography page


636784 L/Cpl. Robert John Clarke, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as stretcher-bearer. Many wounded men were left in front of the position, and it was impossible to rescue them owing to violent machine gun and rifle fire. He made several journeys forward, attending to the wounded men, dressing their wounds where they lay. On the following day he repeatedly guided stretcher parties into No Man's Land. His example of courage and devotion to duty was undoubtedly responsible for saving many lives."


636022 L/Cpl. Sherman Theodore Foster, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as battalion runner. He repeatedly carried messages to and from a captured position in face of extremely heavy rifle and machine gun fire. After three messengers had been killed he succeeded in getting messages through to the advanced troops at a critical time. He did splendidly."




Click here for Sherman Foster's biography page

109359 CSM William Richard Goodchild, DCM + Bar


DCM: "For continuous gallantry and devotion to duty from 25th February to 17th September, 1918. He has been present with his company in all actions during this period. During the action at Boiry on 28th August when all his officers had become casualties he assumed command of his company, and successfully directed the consolidation of a captured line in face of heavy enemy opposition. He has consistently done excellent work."


Bar: "For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on 1st November, 1918, near Valenciennes. When his company commander was holding at bay with his revolver the garrison of a machine-gun post, he organised a parity of rifle grenadiers and crossed to the officer's assistance. Together they rushed the post, wounding three and capturing two prisoners, as well as the gun."


159688 Lt. Albert Edward Griffin, DCM, MM


DCM

"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When his company became disorganised owing to the loss of their officers he rallied the men and led them to the objective. He directed the consolidation of his part of the line, and it was largely due to his courage and skilful handling of a critical situation that the line was held."


220090 Pte. James Harold Hannah, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion duty as runner during an attack. When his company commander and two others were badly wounded by snipers during the advance, he crept forward, shot the foremost sniper, captured the remaining four, and compelled them to carry his wounded officer back to our line. He then rejoined his company and assisted in consolidating the captured position. He set a splendid example of courage and initiative."


109135 Sgt. Leonard Harding, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an attack. When his officer was killed early in the action he took charge of his platoon and led them to their objective in spite of severe resistance. His flank became exposed, and he had to withdraw; he skilfully conducted the operation, and established a defensive line in touch with the unit on his flank. He assisted in breaking up an enemy counter-attack, and at once led a patrol into No Man's Land and captured two prisoners. He set a splendid example of courage and devotion to duty."


109381 RSM. Arthur William Hawkey, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has performed consistent good work throughout, and has at all times set a splendid example."


649409 Pte. Harry Edward Heggart, DCM, MM+Bar


DCM

"When the line was being consolidated, this man, as stretcher-bearer, although wounded, rescued two wounded machine-gunners, crossing an open space of fifty yards, swept by fire, four times. He rescued many wounded by his coolness and disregard of fire."


158011 Lt. Grenville Lloyd Milton Howard, DCM


For actions at Vimy Ridge, on 9th April 1917:


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his men in bombing attacks with the greatest courage and coolness, went forward, bombed two enemy dug-outs, and captured, single-handed, many prisoners."


835650 Pte. Delbert Huyck, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an attack. When the advance was held up by rifle and machine gun fire from a "pill-box," he climbed on to the top of the "pill-box," threw a bomb through an opening in the roof and took the garrison prisoners. He remained on the top of the pill-box sniping at the enemy. He showed the greatest courage and initiative."


109441 Capt. Richmond Logan Layton, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry in action. He attacked with his Company two of the enemy's trenches, displaying great courage and materially assisting in the capture of the trenches. Later, he rendered most valuable services during the consolidation of the position."







407110 Sgt. Gordon Emerson Levy, DCM


Initially assigned to the 2nd CMR, Gordon was transferred to the 4th CMR in the divisional restructuring in January 1916. He was a shell shocked survivor of 2nd June 1916's 'Battle for Mount Sorrel', and thereafter transferred to the 3rd Canadian Division, 8th Machine Gun Company. He received a further wounding on 9th October 1916, and it appears that his DCM was awarded for his action with the 8th Machine Gun Company on that day.


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He displayed great courage and determination throughout the action. He was wounded.


111610 C.S.M. Roy McQuarrie, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He rendered invaluable service in reorganising his company under heavy fire. He was wounded. He has previously done fine work."


109491 C.S.M. James Buchanan Mitchell, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry in action near Folies on 9th August, 1918. When our advance was held up by an enemy anti-tank gun, firing point-blank at our troops, he led two Lewis gun sections to a commanding position under heavy fire, forcing it to withdraw and inflicting casualties on the men and the horses of the team. This act undoubtedly saved the battalion many casualties. He displayed great resource throughout the day."


111392 Sgt. Norman Henry Nicolas, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an attack. When his company became disorganised through loss of Officers, he collected a party and led them in an attack on a "pill-box," from which a machine gun was firing on the company. Almost all the party were put out of action, and he personally accounted for five of the enemy. His example so encouraged the remaining men that the position was successfully captured. He set a magnificent example of courage and initiative."



Click here for Norman Nicholas's biography page


649121 Sgt. William Nodwell, DCM, MM


DCM, whilst Sergeant:


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During a raid on the enemy trenches he led a party of ten men with great dash and gallantry. He cut through the wire under heavy fire of a machine gun in a concrete emplacement, and then surrounded it by a skilful manoeuvre. He personally rushed the gun, bombing the detachment, of which three were killed and the fourth was made a prisoner, the capture of whom supplied identification which was urgently required.


214323 Sgt. William Older, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack. He went forward under heavy rifle and machine-gun fire to a position from which, with his rifle, he could command an enemy pillbox which was causing casualties. For five hours he sniped this pillbox and rendered material assistance to the assault. He has ever set a fine example to his men."

144214 Cpl. James Arthur Post, DCM


When James signed on he claimed to be 19 when he was actually 15 years, 1 month and 27 days old; the third youngest boy to have served with the 4th CMR. For all his youth, some time between March 1916 and May 1918, when he had eventually been found out, James had undertaken action which was recognised in the following citation:


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an attack. When his company was held up by rifle and machine gun fire from the vicinity of a "pill-box" he crept forward under a shower of enemy hand grenades and assisted a man on to the roof of the pill-box, which was then bombed and the garrison were captured. When all the officers had become casualties and the line was in danger of being driven in, with great coolness he held on to the ground gained and sent back valuable information on his own initiative. He set a magnificent example of courage and resource."


727009 Sgt. George Edward Price, DCM


For actions in an attack on Humbug Sap (near Loos, France), on 22nd April 1918


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During a raid on the enemy trenches he led a section of the raiding party, penetrating the positions to a depth of some 350 yards, where he successfully rushed a machine-gun post, killing two of the garrison and scattering the remainder. Although severely wounded, he directed the retirement of his party with much skill, and himself carried a badly wounded comrade back to our lines. His courage and resource were responsible for the success of his portion of the enterprise."


109073 Pte. Charles Routledge, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry during a bombardment, when, in retiring, he rescued a Lewis gun, which he brought across the open, under heavy fire, firing at enemy bombers from shell holes. He also carried in many wounded men."


109579 CSM. Leslie Oliver Rule, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty om 28th August, 1918, near Bony. For two hours he rallied, reorganised and distributed the men of his company after all the officers and all but two of the N..C.Os. had become casualties. His example of courage and initiative restored order in very trying circumstances."


835669 L/Cpl. Carmen Russell Salsbury, DCM


"This man was section commander of the leading section, which came under intense machine-gun fire, losing all its Lewis gunners; so he took the gun and brought it into action, neutralising the enemy's fire. Then, with his officer, who was at once mortally wounded, he rushed the enemy post, seizing their machine gun and turning it on the flying enemy, after which he brought his wounded officer back under heavy fire. The following day his work was also a splendid example to all."


109146 C.S.M. Robert Henry Sanders, DCM, MM


DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an attack. When all his officers became casualties he took command of the company and led it with great courage and skill to the objective. He directed the consolidation of his frontage under heavy fire, and maintained his position until relieved. His example of courage and resource was solely responsible for holding the company together under the most difficult conditions."


648801 Sgt. Peter James Seeley, DCM, MM


DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led a patrol into No Man's Land to reconnoitre the assembly position for an attack. In doing so he encountered an enemy patrol and very skilfully captured a prisoner. When all his officers became casualties in the attack, he took command of his platoon and successfully led them to their objective, which he consolidated and held under heavy fire. He set a splendid example of courage and initiative."


838415 Pte. Charles Oliver Sensabaugh, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry on 2nd November, 1918, near Valenciennes. In charge of a party of snipers he crossed the Escaut Canal on a special reconnaissance. After advancing 2,000 yards, they came up to a machine gun post. He distributed his party, and crawling through a cemetery, got to within 75 yards of it and shot the No. 1. He then rushed the gun, and captured the remainder of the crew."


Click here for Charles Sensabaugh's biography page


112297 Sgt. John James Spilsbury, DCM


Whilst still a Corporal:


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in an attack. When all his officers and senior N.C.Os. were casualties, and his platoon became disorganised, he took command and, rallying his men, led them to their objective in the face of severe opposition, and consolidated and held the position. On the next day he led a daylight patrol into No Man's Land and captured an enemy N.C.O. and a private who had been causing casualties by sniping. His example of courage and coolness materially assisted in saving a critical situation.


Pte. William Mann Todd, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the action on 9th August, 1918 near Folies. When acting as stretcher-bearer with his platoon during the advance a Tank, which had been hit and had caught fire, whereupon he, on his own initiative and without assistance, rescued the crew from the burning Tank. They were all wounded, and he dressed their wounds and got them to a place of safety, calling to a carrying party to remove them. He then rejoined his platoon and carried on with them throughout the action."


Sgt. Percy Turner, DCM


"For gallantry and devotion to duty on 28th August, 1918 near Boiry. He assumed command and rallied not only the men of his own company, but also those of another unit in the vicinity. He reorganised them and carried on the attack, leading his men to the final objective and consolidating the position."


Pte. Robert William Wilson, DCM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the action of 28th August, 1918, near Boisy. When a section of a sunken road was raked by enemy machine-gun fire and practically every man in it became a casualty, he entered the area and dragged all the wounded to safety. He spent the rest of the day rescuing wounded in the open, until he was wounded in the right arm."


CSM Edward Charles Woodroof, DCM


Whilst a Lance Corporal:


"For conspicuous bravery and devotion in volunteering and going out as a scout during a heavy bombardment on two occasions and obtaining much valuable information.



Click here for Edward Woodroof's biography page





MM - Military Medal

136441 L/Sgt. Horace James Clarke, MM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the action of April 19th, 1917 at Vimy Ridge. When his Officer was wounded, and his platoon Sgt. killed, he showed great initiative. He instantly took over his platoon, and led them with great dash, and bravery to their Final Objective on the Crest of the Hill: finding his correct position, and starting them on the work of consolidation. It was largely due to his example that the work of consolidation was so rapidly completed. He remained in charge of his men until relieved some 48 hours later, walking up and down amongst them under heavy shell and machine gun fire. The example he set was largely responsible for the excellent work done by his platoon."


Click here for Horace Clarke's biography page


Sgt. Nelson Ross Crowe, MM


The Sun Times of May 1919 cites:


"It was August last [1918] when all the officers and NCO's of his platoon became casualties and the platoon disorganized, he rallied the men and some from other units in the immediate neighbourhood and carried on the attack against all kinds of fire until the battalion was relieved the next day."


Click here for Nelson Crowe's biography page


Lt. Edward Davison, MM


"Conspicuous devotion to duty as a Platoon Sgt particularly in regards to his work in scouting wiring and patrolling in front of our front line. This Sgt went out every night either in charge of a wiring party, or scouting to the enemy's trenches."



Click here for Edward Davison's biography page


838099 Pte. Clarence Aubrey Jones, MM


Local newspapers (Owen Sound, Ontario) cited the award, during action in the Battle for Valenciennes on the 1st of November 1918, as follows:


"Exceptional work while in charge of a raiding party near Valenciennes."



Click here for Clarence Jones's biography page

157661 Pte. Edward Victor Pettie, MM


"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the action of April 9th, 1917, at Vimy Ridge. He took part in the attack with his platoon to the Swichen Trench, where he showed great initiative, in encouraging the men to consolidate the position. When his platoon was ordered forward to fill a gap on the left of our position he showed great dash and bravery in reorganising and leading forward his men. His Platoon Commander being killed, he took charge of the platoon and extended them across the gap, and then started the work of consolidation which they successfully accomplished under severe flanking machine gun and rifle fire. It was undoubtedly due to this N.C.O's promptness and presence of mind that consolidated was so quickly completed, thereby rendering the counter attack unsuccessful."


Edward, wounded on 23rd April 1917, was consequently unable to return to front line duty.


109597 Pte. Charles Elmore Sheppard, MM


"Under very heavy artillery fire, this signaller left his dugout in Trench and showed conspicuous bravery in repairing a telephone which had been destroyed by enemy fire. He voluntarily left his trench and proceeded into the open, remaining there at a point particularly exposed to and under very heavy fire until he had completely re-established telephone communication."



Click here for Charles Sheppard's biography page




This page was last updated: 31st January 2020